Stanislaw Ignacy Witkiewicz (Witkacy) .........(27)
(Warsaw February 24, 1885 - September 18, 1939 Jeziory, Polesie)


Hinczowe Stawy Portrait of a Man Composition with Gravediggers (Hamlet's Monolog)

"Hinczowe Stawy", 1907, oil on canvas, 68 x 94.5 cm, private collection
"Portrait of a Man", pastel on paper, 61 x 47.5 cm, private collection
"Composition with Gravediggers (Hamlet's Monolog)", 1916, pastel on paper, 51 x 65 cm, National Museum, Cracow

Portrait of a Woman Portrait of Jan Leszczynski Portrait of Modesta Zwolinska

"Portrait of a Woman", 1937, pastel on paper, 69.7 x 49.9 cm, private collection
"Portrait of Jan Leszczynski", 1932, pastel on paper, 61 x 47 cm, private collection
"Portrait of Modesta Zwolinska", IX.1931, pastel on paper, 62 x 47 cm, private collection

Portrait of a Woman Autumn Landscape Winter Landscape II

"Portrait of a Woman", 1930, pastel on paper, 63.5 x 48 cm, private collection
"Autumn Landscape", 1912, oil on canvas, 60.5 x 65.5 cm, private collection
"Winter Landscape II", 1912, oil on canvas, 59 x 70 cm, Museum of Central Pomerania, Slupsk

[..] the Formist group whose members adapted certain features of Futurism, Cubism and Expresionism. The Formist movement was rather short-lived (1917-1922) but it had two excellent protagonists. One was Leon Chwistek [..] The second was Stanislaw Ignacy Witkiewicz - Witkacy, the most extraordinary individuality of artistic and intellectual life in inter-war Poland, painter, theoretician of art, writer, and dramatist. As the son of Stanislaw Witkiewicz, the creator of the vernacular "Zakopane style", he grew up in artistic household and the stimulating Young Poland atmosphere of Zakopane. In 1914, he left, together with the celebrated anthropologist Bronislaw Malinowski, for an exotic trip to Ceylon and Australia, and then spent the October Revolution in Russia. Paintings originating from the period after his return to Poland in 1918 are airless, multi-strata compositions and perverse phantasmagoria, in which threatening monsters with animal shapes wrestle in incomprehensible strife. The forms are flat and angular, and the colour is composed of loud dissonances. In 1919, the artist proclaimed his theory of "Pure Form", the first Polish philosophically grounded theory of art. In the mid-1920s, Witkacy recognised "artistic work" to be barren, and established a one-person openly commercial Portrait Firm, which produced differently priced pastels "made to order" in accordance with the wishes of the client - "smooth" portraits as well as deformed, vibrating images executed under the impact of narcotics. [*]

Artist’s paintings in malarze.com

Click this link to read Witkacy's biography at Culture.pl

Artist biography at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanisław_Ignacy_Witkiewicz

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